Perspectives from the other side of the Atlantic

As the title of this post indicates, I have moved to Paris for the semester and am successfully installed in my apartment – am typing this from there – great to be connected to the world again… So good to get away from the Arctic cold of the mid-west of the USA also… So what is the topic de jour? Gratitude. Why gratitude? Because right now we are pretty focused on what is wrong with the world, so much so that sometimes we do not stop to think about what we should be thankful for. So I am going to share my list(s) with you, in the hope that you will also take some time to reflect on what is important to you.

So, what do I have to be thankful for? Lots of things! Here are the big ones:

a. Good health. This is a big thing that we all often take for granted.

b. A significant other who understands me. While he is not with me while I am away, nevertheless the mental & emotional connection is there. He is also looking after the cats. :)))

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c. A great work environment with smart & likeable colleagues – both here in Paris, as well as at home at IU. It is always good to try and hang out with people who are smarter than me – excellent intellectual stimulation pushes us to all be better scientists…

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d. A terrific place to live – both here and in the USA. My apartment here is really beautifully decorated & it is in a terrific (non-touristy) residential area. I have 2 excellent landladies – let’s call them Madames X & Y – who do not speak much English, but make up for it in kindness & mindfulness. Turns out they have a Buddhist philosophy to life.

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e. Communicating in the local tongue. Understanding people is relatively easy and speaking, of course, is more difficult. I am grateful that I spent the last year pretty much trying to do something in French every day – such as reading or listening to French news programs and also documentaries. What do I recommend for those struggling with French? Here are a couple of suggestions: First, check out the phone app called ‘News in Slow French‘ (see https://www.newsinslowfrench.com/). These are weekly news programs – you can choose which level of expertise – beginner, intermediate or advanced. Second, there is a monthly bilingual magazine (at least in the USA) called ‘France-Amerique‘ (see https://france-amerique.com) that features good reading on culture, food, politics & many other interesting topics. Third, our cable TV service in the USA gives us access to television channel ‘TV5 Monde‘ – a French TV channel that broadcasts around the world. It has terrific documentaries as well as movies and TV series. Four, the French TV channel TF1 has online streaming of their programs – there is a good nightly evening news/commentary program called ‘Le20H‘ (or ‘Le Vingt Heure‘). Of course, now I can see it on TV here locally.

So then there are the little things in life – things that nevertheless make a huge difference:

  1. I have worked out the appliances in my apartment – most importantly, the espresso machine works well.
  2. Turns out my apartment building is next to a fromagerie (cheese shop) that also sells wine. Now how cool is that? Bakery and patisserie are also a stone’s throw away, as is a seafood/fishmonger & supermarket. This is great since I will be a pedestrian/public transport user while I am here.

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  1. I have a 20 minute walk to work (or 2-stops on the metro). Walking is definitely nicer & also better for keeping up the step count.
  2. I can actually see the Eiffel Tower from my living room, bedroom & kitchen windows! – it is quite in the distance (see red circle below), but it looks really terrific lit up at night.

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So, these are my lists of things to be thankful for. What’s on your list?

 

 

On the subject of visas & other paperwork

If you hold a passport from a developed country that does not start wars with others, chances are you will rarely need entry visas to visit other countries on short stays such as conferences and/or vacations. However, for longer stays to live and work – say for a semester – you will need a visa to legally enter and stay in the country of your choosing.

What does one need to do to get a visa when heading to a country like France? Your local French Consulate has an excellent online set of instructions and application forms, that includes a category “Long stay visa for scientists, researchers or university teachers“. With the correct documents you will probably be given a “Passeport Talent” type of long stay visa. There are three steps to the process. Step 1 involves getting an invitation letter/hosting agreement [Protocole/Convention d’accueil] from your host in France. This is an official letter from the institution which has been officially stamped by the local Prefecture. To obtain a hosting agreement you will need to provide your personal details: passport, foreign residence permit [if appropriate] and an official letter from your university stating precisely : (1) when you will arrive in, and depart from, France; (2) what the title of your work project is to be; (3) what and how much your income will be while you are in France. In short, they are looking to make sure that you will be financially secure and are there for a legitimate reason. Your host has to also provide details on their local team and on you as well. Once this document is processed [this can take 2-3 weeks], you will be sent the original, stamped letter to your home address. The helpful folks in the host institution’s Foreign Scholars Office will be able to assist you with this process.

Step 2 involves a visit to your closest French Consulate [in my case Chicago] after making an appointment on-line. You will need to bring your passport (& residence permit, if applicable) and copies of these documents, evidence of a return airline ticket, a passport size photo and your payment [$US115 or 99 Euros]. In addition to your application form you also need to partially complete a “Demande d’attestation OFII” form. Once your documents are processed you will have a visa in your passport, and stamps on your hosting letter and the demande d’attestation form. The staff at the French Consulate in Chicago were very helpful.

You cannot apply for the long term visa earlier than 3 months before departure. Although the processing of my long stay visa took only 2 weeks, the processing can take up to 1 month, so allow adequate time to complete this process. They will send you your passport with new visa/stamped papers to your home address if you provide a self-addressed envelope. I prefer to go and pick up the documents myself since I am not living in my home country. [I am a great believer in Murphy’s Law…] I was fortunate that I was able to drive to Chicago before the weather becomes really awful in late Fall/Winter. In fact yesterday when I went to pick up my passport and newly minted visa it was actually sleeting!

Step 3 is completed after you arrive in France. It involves additional paperwork [completing the rest of the “Demande d’attestation OFII” that was started during Step 2]. The completed form is sent via registered mail to the OFII or the Office Francais de l’integration et de l’immigration. As I understand it, the French authorities also affix a sticker/stamp to the visa in your passport, which apparently validates your visa.

So now the hard paperwork/footwork is done – I have my visa & a place to live! Now I just need to get all my other work finished for the end of the year…

Can you bank on it? Maybe not…

Let’s talk about banking & paying bills while living in a foreign country for a short period of time. When you move overseas this may be a challenge, as banks may not want to issue accounts to foreigners for short periods of time. So what are your options? How will you pay your monthly rent for your apartment? What about credit card bills? How will you have a supply of local currency? What about other bills and expenses? e.g. buying petrol/gas on French autoroutes can be tricky, as vendors often do not accept non-French credit cards. After doing some digging, I think I have some potential solutions to most of these problems –  at least for my situation – in going from the USA to France.

What have I learned about cross-continental and foreign banking so far? The bottom line: it’s complicated and depends partly on the country where you are currently living as a citizen/permanent resident. Since I currently live in the USA, I investigated my banking options there e.g. Can I open an account with a bank based in France while living in the USA? Yes I can, but with a couple of big qualifications. For example, HSBC [in 37 countries] has this plan: you can open an account in the USA – with various options, but if you do not want to pay for international wire transfers and have secure web banking, you must maintain a minimum balance of at least $10K in that account at all times. Then with the same bank you can open an account in France, in which you must maintain a minimum balance of at least 30K Euros. So you now have $10K and 30K Euros tied up in two bank accounts that are untouchable. This is not small potatoes and is out of reach for most people. Additionally, you must present yourself with your papers in a US city where the HSBC has a branch. [Understandable – otherwise people could easily engage in money laundering.] However, if you are in a university town far away from any city in which HSBC has a US branch [i.e. New England & Florida only] then you are looking at a jaunt to one of these East Coast cities before you leave. And the latter account can take about 3 weeks to set up.

The alternative is to wait until getting to France to open up a local bank account. This should, in theory, work. As I understand it, you need a fixed address during your stay, and must provide details of your passport, long-term stay visa and a utility bill/rental contract in your name for that address. They could also ask to see your employment details. The local bank account will give you access to a debit card, cheques, and paper slips called RIBS (Relevé d’Indentité Bancaire) that apparently are used to open utilities accounts in your name etc. Whether or not you will be permitted to open a bank account will depend, in part, on your country of permanent residence. For those coming from the USA this can be tricky: the US Federal Govt (via the IRS) places extra demands on all foreign banks to report information about accounts of all US citizens/permanent residents. Some foreign banks simply refuse to open accounts to those coming from the USA because they do not wish to deal with the extra reporting requirements.

So can you use your existing foreign bank accounts to pay bills? I still have accounts in my home country and performed my own electronic international bank transfer from my account for an apartment security deposit to my future Paris landlord’s account. [Note that this can take 3-4 business days.] Although I had paid the international transfer fee to my bank for the transaction, the sum of money arriving at the other end was 14.50 Euros less than arranged! Why the shortfall? Additional fees were charged – not by my bank – but by other bank(s) for the transaction. Either the destination bank or intermediary bank, or both, can charge additional fees – and you will not know about these until the transaction is completed. Even if I had put a trace on the transaction these additional fees would only have been seen after the fact. [Me thinks that this is a bit of skullduggery in this digital age…] So, how best to deal with this problem? Apparently the fees are likely to be constant – so if you were to engage in repeated transactions to the same foreign account you would just increase the balance that you are transferring to include the additional fees.

One unanswered question will be how I will deal with utilities bills if opening a local bank account is not possible. My guess: they should take credit card payments, however, there is a possibility that they might not take payment by foreign credit card.

What about using foreign ATM/credit cards etc. while you are living overseas? Thankfully, these days this is relatively easy – bank/credit card company apps on smartphones and computers have reasonable security and make electronic banking easy for the consumer. Foreign credit card bills can be easily paid from your foreign bank account(s) – if you do decide to use your ATM/credit cards from your home country. (However, you will be charged fees on foreign currency transactions, and these will add up over time). If you are using USA-based cards, beware that they are what I call faux chip & pin – they can sometimes cause problems when used overseas. Secure chip & pin cards are used today in most developed countries [with the exception of banks in the USA and Germany, as I understand it].

There can be some interesting idiosyncrasies for banking in France: if you are a married woman, you may be asked to provide proof that your husband has approved of you opening the account. For this and other idiosyncrasies see this excellent website about banking in France: https://www.expatica.com/fr/finance/Banking-in-France-Opening-a-bank-account-in-France_101158.html  See also: http://www.frenchpropertylinks.com/essential/banking.html This website is specifically targeted to people living in the UK, and who need to access banking services in France.

What is the take home message here? Do your homework. Do it early. It will take longer to sort things out than you might expect. If possible, test out funds transfers etc. ahead of time, or at least make sure that your electronic banking is set-up and is working without glitches at home before you leave. The solution to your particular problem and situation will likely be unique – your circumstances will probably be very different to mine, and to those of others embarking on a similar odyssey.

P.S. After uploading this post, friends & colleagues with links to France kindly advised me to check out: 1. on-line only French banking options: https://www.banques-en-ligne.fr/      2. borderless banking: https://transferwise.com/borderless?utm_expid=32817948-178.7YOAzw2WSiSrEMGAAxgUVQ.0&utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.fr%2F#borderless-account So it looks like there is quite a bit more homework to do!

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First neurowandering steps…

A career in neuroscience opens many doors – both professional and personal. This includes travel to beautiful places, and making new friends & keeping in touch with old friends across the world. Come to think of it, science actually has no doors or walls! And as scientists we must truly be grateful for that.

For me, an exciting new adventure in science is about to unfold. I have the good fortune to be able to spend some time in another country for a semester – on sabbatical. As I make my preparations to move [again] to another country, I thought it would be good to share some of my experiences. Many scientists, at all career stages, are probably having to go through a similar experience. Perhaps my reflections on my own neurowanderings might make it a bit easier for others who are considering doing the same.

Today I was able to secure a furnished apartment – navigating through the various stages of completing the contract, and taking out renter’s insurance. What a relief it is to know that I will have a place to live – one huge detail taken care of.

What advice would I give to someone who is looking for accommodation in a new city in another country?

  1. Get to know the city overall. If already not familiar with the city, ask friends who are [and who may already live there] for suggestions.
  2. Familiarize yourself with individual city neighborhoods and locales. Where will your work be based relative to where you will live? Will you be close to public transport, shops and other services? What other interesting things are in the locale where you will live? Is the neighborhood a safe one – can you come and go to your dwelling at night safely? Googlemaps can actually be a great tool for investigating a neighborhood’s characteristics.
  3. Find a reputable organization that deals with advertising/and renting apartments/houses. Search the internet for bad reviews on these services, or ask friends who know which ones are reliable. Your new work place will probably also be very useful for suggestions. My travels will take me to Paris. For this city I can recommend http://www.lodgis.com – their website makes searching easy and their staff are very responsive and professional.
  4. After finding a house/apartment obtain renter’s insurance. Make sure your belongings (and the contents of the dwelling, if furnished) will be covered against losses. Again for a place in Paris, check out: http://www.french-furnished-insurance.com/fr/ This website gives all details in French and English.
  5. Pay your security deposit and agency fees. You should be able to do this via credit card, and once you have got to this stage the process should be pretty much complete.